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The Footprint Garden

The Footprint Garden, located to the west of the Visitors Pavilion, is a large, foot-shaped garden plot that symbolizes the impact of humans on nature. The garden is designed to raise awareness of sustainability issues and present the role of gardening in maintaining balance with the ecosystem and the importance of a diversity of organisms, large and small, and the role of each one in the web of life.

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A colourful mix of butterfly-attracting vegetation grows inside and outside of the footprint: nectar in flowers, and leaves as a surface for egg-laying and as food for larvae. Besides providing enjoyment and beauty, butterflies serve as a biological indicator of the changes occurring in the ecosystem.

For example, fringed rue (Ruta chalepensis) is a medicinal plant with a controversial aroma in the human world, but the Old World swallowtail butterfly (Papilio machaon) finds safe lodgings within it to rear its young.

Most of the plants in the crucifer family will probably be hosts for the cabbage moth (Pieris brassicae), but during tough times the garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) will also suffice. But don’t worry; the larvae will not come to nibble leaves in the nearby shrubbery. Even scutch grass (Cynodon dactylon), which is generally considered a ‘weed’, is favoured by the large brown wall (Lasiommata maera); the females of this species lay their eggs on it.

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our deeds today determine the ecological stamp we’ll leave for generations; it’s better that we choose to leave the colourful, free footprints of flowers and butterflies…

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Bird-attracting plants also grow in the Footprint Garden: species of Buddleja, Hibiscus, and Lantana, which breathe life into the garden. To illustrate this, breeding boxes were hung to strengthen the songbird populations.

Renewable energy devices are scattered around the garden: windmills that present the potential use of wind energy; a solar tree that uses solar energy to cool water for the visitors’ wellbeing; and the plumbing of the geothermal cooling system deep beneath the garden – you can see the pipes leading through a window to the soil’s depths.

These all convey an important message for the future: our deeds today determine the ecological stamp we’ll leave for generations; it’s better that we choose to leave the colourful, free footprints of flowers and butterflies…

 

At the heel of the footprint is a shaded sitting corner that encourages sustainability: this corner tells the story of sustainability at Ramat Hanadiv and provides information about sustainable conduct in the home.

The garden is looked after by the green fingers of Ramat Hanadiv’s volunteers, who take part in the gardening.

Of further interest...

Accessibility

Accessible Trails

We have worked hard to make our buildings, infrastructure and service accessible to special sectors of the population so that everyone can enjoy an accessible and enjoyable visit to the Memorial Gardens and Nature Park.

For further information >>

Sustainability

Establishment of the Partnership for Regional Sustainability

In 2015, Ramat Hanadiv established the Partnership for Regional Sustainability, aiming to combine forces for the quality of life in the region.

For further information >>

Dining Here

Dining-Kiosk

Refresh yourself at the Kiosk with a drink or snack. The kiosk is open daily.

For further information >>